Kaleido by Silkie B.

Knitting Designs By Silka Burgoyne

Kaleido by Silkie B – Accessory 2011 eBook April 19, 2012

As I am working on the new Accessory Collection for year 2012. I decided to combine 4 of my accessory patterns that I designed last year and created an eBook. This publication is currently available for sales in Ravelry.com in a discounted price. You can still however buy each individual pattern separately.

Here are the detail of the patterns that included in the collection:

Maneisha

Maneisha is the very first design I have created for my Accessory Collection 2011. Maneisha is a fingerless mittens design that combined Eyelet Cable Rib and a texture stitch. I wanted to create a design that is fun for experienced knitters and also fun for beginner who would like to experience working on cable and lace and using magic loop method.

Hannie
A little cable beanie design for both kids and adult. Please don’t be fooled by the cover, the pattern for this beanie has adult sizing! Hannie features allover double texture cable motif and it is perfect for both gender. Knit in heavy worsted weight or bulky yarn and it will definitely keep you nice and cozy in the winter. Hannie knits up quickly and will be a perfect gift for the holiday.
Serena

Serena is a cable cowl that is a perfect accessory for the cold weather. It is also a perfect gift for someone you love. Work in worsted-weight yarn and features interweave cable panel pair with 6-sts cable rib that is perfect for both gender and kids. Serena is easily customize to fit each individual needs.

Reese

Reese is a cable scarf and Beanie set is for all ages and gender. It’s a prefect gift for anyone or yourself.

Reese Scarf measures 60″ x 8.5” and it can be widen or length depending on personal preference. It can also modified to turn into a cowl. Attached I-cord has applied to all sides of the scarf to prevent the side to roll inward. The attached I-cord also create a nice smooth side edging.

Kaleido by Silkie B – Accessory 2011 is on sales now on Ravelry.com for $10 USD. If you are interested in this collection, simple click on the ‘Buy Now’ Button below and it will bring you to my Ravelry. If you would like to purchase any of the patterns within this collection, simple click on the design image that you like, it will bring you to the individual pattern detail page and you can purchase through there.

Happy Knitting!!

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Knit Gloves – Free eBook March 1, 2012

For those of you who loves to knit gloves and mittens, you might be interested in this eBook features 7 wonderful and unique patterns that was previously published in the magazine. One of my design, ‘Lace and Twists Gloves’, was previously featured in the Interweave Gifts, 2009 publication, is included in this eBook. This eBook is absolutely free to download, simple click on the image to get your free Copy!

Here is the detail of these wonderful patterns, these image and description are from http://www.knittingdaily.com:

Lace and Twist Gloves by Silka Burgoyne

This glove knitting pattern forms with a frame of a simple cable in columns of lace. Sock yarn with a blend of wool and bamboo was selected for finesse and refinement to create decadent knit gloves. The perfect luxurious gift for yourself or a loved one, this knit gloves pattern is one you are sure to turn to again and again.

Layered Turkish Gloves by Mari Lynn Patrick

Mari Lynn designed these ambidextrous knitted gloves to work with equal comfort on either hand. Worn together or alone, both the knit gloves and undergloves are rich and beautiful. The solid-colored undergloves are a dramatic “opera” length, while the over-gloves incorporate stunning Turkish patterning. This Turkish sock pattern is interpreted with varying background coloration and is complemented with the simpler colorwork on the palm and glove.

Uncommon Gardening Gloves by Donna Druchunas

Donna looked in vain for gardening gloves with a comfortable fit, so being the adventurous knitter she is, she tried knitting a pair for herself. She used a washable cotton yarn blended with stretchy elastic to make her knitted gloves snug and flexible. The easy-to-knit side gussets allow lots of room for flexing thumbs, and are quite the ingenious feature of this knit gloves pattern. These gloves are definitely practical, but the lace pattern at the cuff makes them good enough for wearing out and about (after washing of course).

Two Color Norwegian Gloves by Nancy Bush

These knit gloves were inspired by a pair with similar patterning in the Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum in Decorah, Iowa. Worked in the round, these knitted gloves are made warmer with two layers of yarn, resulting from the intricate two-color patterning. Although the pattern and shaping makes this a challenging project, the end result is work the effort. Knit some tradition into your wardrobe when you claim your free knitting patterns for gloves collection!

Motley Mitts by Lisa Shroyer

The distinctive coloration of projects worked in variegated yarns always has that “handknitted” look (not a bad thing). So Lisa decided to celebrate the knit stitch with a simple mitten knitting pattern. A chunky two-ply with very short color runs is worked in rows of stockinette, forming a subtle hourglass shape with short rows. This hourglass folds over the hand and wrist and is seamed up one side, creating knitted mittens with a tailored fit. The short-rows in the fingerless mittens knitting pattern are very basic and easy to follow making this a good project for practicing this shaping technique.

Winter Twilight Mitts by Laura Rintala

This fingerless gloves knitting pattern was inspired by a purple overcast sky showing through the black silhouettes of winter trees. Originally, Laura planned to make the knit mittens two at a time but the tension of the stitches didn’t work with the soft cashmere yarn. So instead, she slipped them onto bamboo DPNs and worked them up separately. Thankfully, the luxurious feel of the yarn made these knit fingerless gloves sheer indulgence to work separately.

Mittens, Interrupted by Eunny Jang

Another study of the use of variegated yarns in knitted mittens, this mitten knitting pattern is the perfect simple design for knitters of all levels. Paired with a dark solid, a bright yarn and woven-look slip-stitch gussy up this truly easy knit. With only two pattern rows and no hand shaping, you can have this design started and finished in no time.

Happy Knitting!!
 

Easy Breezy Shores May 16, 2011

Breeze Shore - Creative Knitting July 2011

Just like the title said, an easy breezy cardigan that is perfect for the warm climate. This is my cardigan design that is currently published in the July 2011 issue of Creative Knitting.

This lightweight cardigan is worked in fine sock yarn with size 4 needles…. it is also mostly seamless.. I said mostly because there are 2 seams to join the shoulder together. The entire cardigan is work in one piece from bottom up till the arm shaping; then the back piece and 2 front pieces are worked separately. The 3rd quarter sleeves are worked from top down and sleeves caps are shaped using short-row after the shoulder seams are joined. The lace border is worked in such a way that is joined to the front side while knitting it. Hence, there is no sewing the border to the cardigan afterward. Of course, it’s up to personal preference to how to work the lace border.

I love minimal design; clean, classic and very practical; so this cardigan in a way is very me. As always, if you have question of the design, feel free to leave me a message.

Happy Knitting!

 

Victoria and Bonnie is available!! September 7, 2010

Just want to announce that the patterns for Victoria Gloves, Victoria Socks and Bonnie Mitts are available through my site, Ravelry and my etsy store. Simple go to my pattern link and click on the image for more information. I have also put Victoria Gloves and Socks as a set in a discounted price.

As always, if you have any questions regarding the patterns. Please feel free to contact me!

Happy Knitting!

 

Introducing Bonnie – Accessory Collection 1 September 2, 2010

Bonnie Mitt


I am very excited that my accessory collection for the Fall is shaping up. I first introduced ‘Victoria’ yesterday and today, let me introduce ‘Bonnie’; a fingerless mitten design.

The inspiration of ‘Bonnie’ came from my dear sister ‘Bonnie’. Bonnie is my rock. I know that I can tell her anything and she is always there for me. Bonnie is always there to listen and provide her honest opinion and support. It have been a very tough year for me and without Bonnie’s support, I might not be able to pull through. I chose a rather simple lace motif with twisted curvy border; the curvy border between each lace repeat looks like the gentle wave in the water… I love the water, living in West Michigan, I am lucky to be so close to Lake Michigan.. the curvy border reminding me the wave by the lake.. it’s so beautiful and calm and relax… and my sister Bonnie, is like the gentle wave in the lake, she can always calm me down and give me an ease feeling when I am stressing out… although Bonnie is rather tense and stress out sometime.. and very intense in some occassion or many occassion.. but she will always be my calming wave. In addition, her chinese name means ‘smooth, wave, round’ so the lace motif certaily represents her well.

Bonnie


So to my dear sister, Bonnie, this post is dedicated to you by your always busy and stress out sister… and with your support.. I know I will always be OK. Thanks for being so supportive and being such a great sister.

Cheers!

 

Meeting Lindsey…… August 4, 2010

Filed under: General,Knitting Life — silkaburgoyne @ 2:10 pm
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When you think of yarn, wool will most likely be one material that come into most of the people’s mind…. wool indeed a common material that make into yarn… as yarn evolves through time… nowadays almost everything can make into yarn… alpaca, camal, soy, bamboo, cotton, silk etc are very common… then comes some items that I don’t think can be possible to make into yarn… think sugarcane, seacell and even milk… Milk? How could it be possible? I have my doubt until I actually touch a skein of yarn that is 80% milk fiber… looks and feels absolutely wonderful!

But I am here not to talk about yarn evolution, I am here to talk about meeting Lindsey Ligett.

A couple days ago, with a connection from Shirley, a lady from my knitting group, introduced me to her niece, Lindsey, who happened to be in town for a visit. Lindsey is the owner of Waterloo Wools, a small business that locates in Waterloo, Ontario that specialize in hand dyed, handspun yarns and spinning fibers. I enjoy working with all type of yarns, of course everyone should know that by now.. but I am totally clueless on how yarn is made. I always admire people that can spun and dyed their own yarns… and meeting Lindsey who specialize in those 2 things is such a wonderful experience for me.

During our meeting, Lindsey has graciously given me a few skeins of her hand-dyed yarns that I attached in this post. Don’t you think the yarns look amazing? Lindsey did such a great job on the colors and they are absolutely beautiful. Amongst my goodies, one of the skein is made with 80% Milk Fiber and 20% Merino Wool, one skein is made with merino wool and seacell.. and there is one that is made with merino wool and Tencel. Of course I can’t just take the yarns and not do anything with them. In return, I will put myself into the design gear (soon after I finished my other project commitment) and design a few items that will features the yarns that Lindsey has given me so that she can showcase her yarns in the trade shows that are coming up in the middle of September and late October in Canada. It is also a good opportunity for me as an indie designer to reach out to other knitters using a different channel. So please stay tune for my designs in the next couple months that features Waterloo Wools.

Thanks again to Lindsey for the beautiful yarn and I am truly grateful.

 

Magic, the Magical Loop January 3, 2009

Filed under: Technique — silkaburgoyne @ 11:03 pm
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I knitted my very first pair of socks using 5 dpn, the traditional way what a lot of knitters think. Although the socks came out great for a first timer in socks knitting, I wanted to have an easier way to knit socks. Then a couple years ago, I heard about people talking about the Magical Loop method, I also heard people saying about knitting a pair of socks using 2 circular needles. I wasn’t sure how I felt about the magical loop method when I first heard it… but since handknit socks are in everyone wish list for the holiday, I was willing to try different method to knit socks faster. I finally did some research on the magical loop method and try it. And I totally love it. Since mastering the skill, I have knitted more than 10 pairs of socks and I also using magical loop method method for fingerless mitten, finger mitten and hat. Since most of the socks patterns are written in 5 dpn, so I have figured out a basic sock pattern to use magic loop. I have so much fun knitting socks and mitten, I have started designing pattern for socks and gloves for using the method.

To see whether the magical loop is a better method than 5 dpn, I have tested in a seasoned knitter, my mother. She have been knitting for more than 40 years. She knitted everything using dpn and she believes it’s easier to use dpn when I taught her the magical loop method. she tried the first pair of finger mitten using magic loop, she was not sure when she started; however, when the mitten was finished, she absolutely loves the magic loop method. I figured if I can change my mother’s mind, then the magic loop method is indeed a good alternative to dpn for socks, mitten etc…


Here is a design that was published in the November issue of Creative Knitting magazine. The fingerless mitten is knitted using magic loop method.

In case anyone who is not familiar with the magic loop method, a magic loop is actually a long circular needle, a circular needle with at least 32″ long, preferable with circular needle that has very flexible wire, such as needle from KnitPicks or Audi Turbo needle.

Following is the instruction of the magic loop method:

1. Cast on an even number of stitches (sts) and slide sts to middle of cable.

2. Divide sts in half and pull cable loop out between two groups of sts.

3. Slide sts down to their respective needle tops. You will have half of your sts on each needle tip. Hold needle tops parallel and pointing to right, working yarn will hang from back group of sts (I’ll call the sts as group 1, and the front group of sts as group 2).

4. Pull the needle tip out (will be group 1 sts) until you have enough cable to allow you to work sts (group 2) on front needle .

5. Work all sts on front needle, being careful not to twist.

6. Turn work and make sure the working yarn is hanging from back and needle tip point to the right. Slide the front group of stitiches to the needle tip then repeat step 4 as many times as needed.

So here is the simple way of magic loop method. The first few rows might look a little different because there might seem to have a gap in between the join of the round. However, as you continue working, the gap will automatically closed up. It might seem awkward to knit a pair of socks using the method at first; however, once you get familiar with it, it is a piece of cake.